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Menstrual Cup Information

Materials

Each Cupcake is made from Medical Grade Silicone using a production technique, Liquid Silicone Injection mould.
The cup varies in size and is available in Small and Large
Our #fcukplastics cupcakes are only available in PINK. 

Size

SMALL cup is a cup for young girls and women who have not yet given birth.
LARGE cup is designed for any woman who has already given birth, as well as for women with a regular sex life and women over the age of 28

Small Cup

cup length including stem: 70,3mm (including stem 16mm)
cup width (diameter): 42,5mm
total volume of cup: 25 ml
safe volume of cup: 22 ml
cup volume up to air vents: 22 ml

Large Cup

cup length including stem: 76,3mm (including stem 17mm) 
cup width (diameter): 45,5mm
total volume of cup: 35 ml 
safe volume of cup: 30 ml
cup volume up to air vents: 30 ml

Menstrual Cup Information

Materials

Each Cupcake is made from Medical Grade Silicone using a production technique, Liquid Silicone Injection mould.
The cup varies in size and is available in Small and Large
Our #fcukplastics cupcakes are only available in PINK. 

Size

SMALL cup is a cup for young girls and women who have not yet given birth.
LARGE cup is designed for any woman who has already given birth, as well as for women with a regular sex life and women over the age of 28

Small Cup

cup length including stem: 70,3mm (including stem 16mm)
cup width (diameter): 42,5mm
total volume of cup: 25 ml
safe volume of cup: 22 ml
cup volume up to air vents: 22 ml

Large Cup

cup length including stem: 76,3mm (including stem 17mm) 
cup width (diameter): 45,5mm
total volume of cup: 35 ml 
safe volume of cup: 30 ml
cup volume up to air vents: 30 ml

About your menstrual cup

History

It wasn’t until the 19th Century that menstrual cups started to become popular. Two midwives decided to upgrade from the cup-and-belt combo to a cup that could be worn inside the body. Made from rubber, these cups set the stage for the now silicone menstrual cups we know and love today.  In 1987, The Keeper, was manufactured in the United States. This proved to be the first commercially viable menstrual cup and it is still available today. The first silicone menstrual cup was the UK-manufactured Mooncup in 2001.

Lifespan
If carefully cleaned and looked after by following our Care instruction below your Cupcake is set to last anywhere between 1-5 years. The longest recorded menstrual cup lifespan was up to 10 years. 

Low Cervix

YOU CAN USE A CUP IF YOU HAVE A LOW CERVIX!!!
Determining your Cervix Height:
If you suspect you have a low cervix, but you aren’t sure. You can measure at any time, but your cervix is typically at its lowest point during your period.
You can measure the height of your cervix simply by inserting your middle finger into your vagina (wash your hands first, of course) until it touches your cervix. You’ll know you’ve hit the cervix because it is both firm and rounded. Note which knuckle is closest to your vaginal opening. If it’s the first knuckle closest to your fingertip, you have a low cervix. If it is the second one in the middle of your finger, you have a medium cervix. If it is the base of the finger, you have a high cervix. Granted these measurements are not the most accurate, but for the purposes of determining the height of your cervix for cup usage it will do the job..
You can also ask your gynaecologist at your next exam to assist. They are very familiar with menstrual cups and might even have some professional tips and advice.
Low Cervix - Menstrual Cup that fits:
If you’ve found that your cervix is low, you will need a shorter cup in order for it to fit comfortably and securely in your vagina. Our cupcakes measurements include the stem, if needed you can trim the stem, to fit inside. 
The ring size also makes a difference. You will use the small you are under 28 and have never given birth, and the large if you are over 28 or have given birth naturally. C-Section ladies fall under the Small depeding your age. 
It is important to note the capacity. If you have a heavy flow, you will need a higher capacity cup. Same goes for if you plan to have it in for long periods of time and will be unable to empty and re-insert regularly. Listed under size you can find all the technical information on the exact mm. Even if you have a low cervix, the cup should be completely inside your vagina, although the stem may extend outside your vaginal opening. If this happens, you can trim the stem for your comfort. If you’re new to using menstrual cups, you may want to wait to trim the stem until you’ve had some practice removing the cup. Once you’re comfortable, though, you can trim down the stem. Carefully cut off a small amount of the stem at a time until the stem no longer shows outside your vagina. Do not cut off a lot at once, as you could cut the menstrual cup, which means you will need to purchase a new one. NEVER cut the stem while it is inserted in your vagina. Please be safe. 
Discomfort:
If you are experiencing a form of discomfort your cupcake may be sitting to close to your cervix. Your cupcake should sit lower than a tampon. If your cupcake leaks it is not sealed correctly and sitting incorrectly. Ensure your cup is not sitting to one side or the other of your cervix, if your cup doesn’t seem like it is in the right place, remove the cup and reinsert it. The other reason could be that your cupcake did not completely open, you can check if your cup is open all the way by running your fingers around the rim. If you are having troubles with the opening of the cup you may need a smaller cup. If your cupcake is overflowing, it could be that your cervix is sitting inside the cup and you may want to lower it’s position. Break the seal of the cup before removal. To break the seal, push gently on the rim before you pull out the cup so that airflow is allowed and removal of the suction for an easier exit. 
Proper Care

You insert the cup, which is made from medical grade silicone, and remove it periodically to rinse and clean as necessary. Since the cup sits snuggly in your vagina, it is important to keep it clean in order to avoid infection and bacterial or yeast growth.

It is important to use simple sanitary practices when using your cups. Failure to keep your cups clean and sanitised is a recipe for disaster. If your cup isn’t cleaned appropriately, it is vulnerable to bacterial growth. Bacteria can lead to infections, and if left untreated, these infections can be pose a serious health risk.

In addition to keeping your cups clean and sanitised, we do recommend washing your hands before touching your cups, often overlooked aspect of sanitation, can prevent transmission of bacteria from your hands to your cups.

SANITISE YOUR CUPCAKE

You can sanitise your cup by simply placing it in boiling water. Be sure to bring the water to a bubbling boil and submerge the cup carefully for a period of between 3-5 minutes. DO NOT LEAVE UNATTENDED, if you over heat your cup it may melt or become disfigured.

Another option is to sanitise your cup in the microwave. Fcukplastics cupcakes are safe to sanitise in your microwave. Fill a microwave-safe container or your orange silicone cup holder with water and place your cup inside. Microwave the container with your cup for three to five minutes. Do not use a cover so steam can escape as needed, and let the water cool before removing the cup.

CLEAN YOUR CUPCAKE

Cleaning differs from sanitising in that sanitising is meant specifically to kill off dangerous bacteria whereas cleaning is meant to remove debris. You do not need to sanitise your cup every time after use, we recommend a sanitisation before your period and after.

To clean your cup use mild soap that is perfume-free, oil-free, and optionally anti-bacterial. Make sure to rinse the cup completely before you reinsert it to ensure you’ve removed all the soap.
Our cups have tiny air holes near the rim. Do not try to clean these with a pin or other sharp object, which can harm the cup. Instead, hold the holes under running water to rinse them. If you must use something to clean them, try a bio-toothbrush or bio-earbud.

If you are in a public restroom and cleaning your cup isn’t practical, you have a couple of options. One is to bring a bottle of water with you into the stall, then rinse the cup over the toilet and pat it dry with toilet paper. The other is to simply wipe out the cup with toilet paper and then store it in your Orange Silicone cup holder and clean it at the next opportunity.

DRY AND STORE

After you sanitise your cup or it at the end of your period, let it air dry. To store your cups, place it in a breathable pouch. Do not put the cup in a plastic container, as that can keep it from getting the airflow it needs to air dry. If your cup does not dry completely, bacteria and mould can begin to grow.
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